Photoshoot

Tuesday I spent a delightful morning being a photo model. This came about via the power of the Internet. A freelance photographer put a notice on Craig’s List that she needed to take pictures of weavers for upcoming submissions to a farming magazine. A friend forwarded her notice to me, and viola! A complete stranger brings several thousand dollars worth of photo gear to my house and spends the morning figuring out how to light a double-back-beam Baby Wolf loom.

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This was not a paid gig (other than a free 4×6 print of the “good” shots.) But I thought it worthwhile because I’d like there to be more visibility of weaving in the media.

It excites me that a farming magazine is calling for images of people weaving. How cool is that?

I then turned the tables on her by snapping her picture (photographers find this disconcerting) and asking if I could blog about the experience. The talented and friendly Janet Horton said yes.

[img_assist|nid=21|title=|desc=|link=none|align=none|width=480|height=640]

What was amazing was that with the right lighting, even my point-and-shoot camera could take a darn fine picture. My loom has never looked so good! I sure wish I’d had those lights when I was photographing all those items for the WeaveCast fundraising auction…

[img_assist|nid=12|title=|desc=|link=none|align=none|width=480|height=640]

No pictures of me on this post. Janet is going to take the best images and “Photoshop” tTuesday I spent a delightful morning being a photo model. This came about via the power of the Internet. A freelance photographer put a notice on Craig’s List that she needed to take pictures of weavers for upcoming submissions to a farming magazine. A friend forwarded her notice to me, and viola! A complete stranger brings several thousand dollars worth of photo gear to my house and spends the morning figuring out how to light a double-back-beam Baby Wolf loom.

[img_assist|nid=22|title=|desc=|link=none|align=none|width=480|height=640]

This was not a paid gig (other than a free 4×6 print of the “good” shots.) But I thought it worthwhile because I’d like there to be more visibility of weaving in the media.

It excites me that a farming magazine is calling for images of people weaving. How cool is that?

I then turned the tables on her by snapping her picture (photographers find this disconcerting) and asking if I could blog about the experience. The talented and friendly Janet Horton said yes.

[img_assist|nid=21|title=|desc=|link=none|align=none|width=480|height=640]

What was amazing was that with the right lighting, even my point-and-shoot camera could take a darn fine picture. My loom has never looked so good! I sure wish I’d had those lights when I was photographing all those items for the WeaveCast fundraising auction…

[img_assist|nid=12|title=|desc=|link=none|align=none|width=480|height=640]

No pictures of me on this post. Janet is going to take the best images and “Photoshop” them. I now understand the vast feeling of relief that my WeaveCast guests evidence when I assure them that the interview audio will be edited. Indeed. Photoshop me, please! Images of me weaving, spinning, and knitting should be up on her Web site in the next month or so.

In the meantime, take a look at these amazing work she’s done of other weavers and animals in Kenya.

I’m thrilled to have been photographed by such a talented artist! Here’s hoping that farming magazine buys her weaving pictures. I’d love it if somewhere in Indiana, someone looks at a picture of me or my hands and says “Hey this weaving thing looks cool. Think I’ll give it a try.”hem. I now understand the vast feeling of relief that my WeaveCast guests evidence when I assure them that the interview audio will be edited. Indeed. Photoshop me, please! Images of me weaving, spinning, and knitting should be up on her Web site in the next month or so.

In the meantime, take a look at these amazing work she’s done of other weavers and animals in Kenya.

I’m thrilled to have been photographed by such a talented artist! Here’s hoping that farming magazine buys her weaving pictures. I’d love it if somewhere in Indiana, someone looks at a picture of me or my hands and says “Hey this weaving thing looks cool. Think I’ll give it a try.”

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